Chronological History

1759, 23rd July

Work begun on laying the keel at Catham Dockyard.

1765, 7th May

Launched at Chatham.

1779

Flagship of Sir Charles Hardy

1780

Flagship of Admiral Frederick Geary and Rear Admiral Samuel Drake

1781

Flagship of Admiral Hyde-Parker

Flagship of Admiral Kempenfelt

1782

Flagship of Admiral Lord Howe

Flagship of Admiral Lord Hood

1787 - 1790

Large repair, cost £33,500.

1791

Flagship of Admiral Lord Hood

1793

At the reduction of Toulon

1794

Siege of Calvi and Bastia.

1795

Flagship of Admiral Man and Sir John Jervis

1797

Battle of St Vincent, Admiral Jervis created Earl St Vincent.

Nearly wrecked in Lagos Bay.

Blockade of Cadiz, Paid off.

1798

As hospital ship, nearly converted to convict hulk.

1801 -1803

Large repair. Ship virtually rebuilt.

1803

Flagship of Admiral Lord Nelson

1805

Blockade of Cadiz. Battle of Trafalgar. (Badly damaged)

1806

Middle repair at Chatham.

1807

Re-rated as a Second Rate, masts and yards reduced, 24Pdr cannons replaced by 18Pdrs, 2 x 32Pdr cannons removed and ships company reduced by one hundred men.

1808

Flagship of Admiral Saumarez, serving the Baltic.

1809

Brought home part of Sir John Moore's army from Corunna.

Blockade of Kronstadt.

1811

Flagship of Admiral York, carried reinforcements to Lisbon

1812

Last time under sail on entering Portsmouth Harbour on 3rd November.

Paid off on the 30th November.

Became the flagship of the Port Admiral.

1817

Re-rated as First Rate

1824

Flagship of the Port Admiral.

1830

Became the Reidence of the Captain of Ordinary.

Headquarters of the Reserve Fleet.

1831

Flagship of the Port Admiral.

1832

Flagship of the Admiral Superintendent.

1847

Flagship of the Commander in Chief Portsmouth.

Lieutenant Pascoe, the signal Lieutenant at Trafalgar was her captain, before his promotion to rear-admiral.

She was growing old, her first admiral, Keppel, had died as long ago as 1786 and in 1836 Saumarez, her last admiral as a sea going ship, died in his beloved Guernsey.

1869

Tender to H.M.S. Duke of Wellington.

1889

Flagship of the Commander in Chief Portsmouth, and is until this day.

1903

Rammed by H.M battleship Neptune, on 23rd October (on its way to be scrapped). Neptunes ram bow pierced the side where Nelson died. Ship docked to stop her sinking. Repaired and moored at her usual bouys.

1905

Saluting ship, sun-set gun custom by Victory.

Up to 1906 in company with H.M.S. St Vincent as a training ship for boys.

1922

Ship's hull now rotten, moved back into dry dock.

Money raised by Society for Nautical Research to restore the ship back to her ‘Trafalgar' appearance.

On completion inspection by His majesty King George V. (1928)

1928

Ship open to visitors.

1936

Victory first used for important visitors by Admiral Sir William Fisher.

1939

All relics removed to Fort Southwick, at the outbreak of World War II.

1941

Damaged by a German 500lb bomb, port-side forward on the night of 10th/11th March.

Admiralty House damaged, Nelson's cabin used by the Commander in Chief, Admiral Sir William James.

1945

Re-opened for visitors.

1946

Rerigged and was visited by 193,443 people, being floodlit for the victory celebrations.

1954-6

She was fumigated against death watch beetle, which had eaten into her timbers.

1971

Major repairs to the stern.

1987

Major repairs to the Bow Sprit, Beak, Upper Gundeck, Middle Gundeck, Lower Gundeck, these repairs on the for end of the ship. Starboard side planking still being replaced, and the futtocks replaced as required.

1989

The sailors who used to guide the visitors around the ship were replaced by the ‘Victory Corps of Guides'.

1993-94

Main mast struck for repair and re-rigging.

1994

Nelson's cabin refurbished.

1994-95

Mizzen Mast struck and rerigged.

1995

Work on the starboard side carried out.

 

Taken from Nelson Victory Fact File by Cliff Watts

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